FAQ

Do I need to contact my agent or insurance company before I contact Cornerstone Auto Glass?

Call Cornerstone Auto Glass first. We are experts at verifying insurance coverage, filing the claim and handling all the paperwork. We will work with your insurance company and set up the glass claim for you, making it as hassle free as possible. The only thing you may need to do is verify some information for your insurance company.

Do I, as a customer, have the right to choose any auto glass shop that I want to use?

Yes. You the customer have the right to choose any auto glass repair and windshield replacement facility you wish to use. Your insurance company and the billing network that your insurance company contracts with does not have the right to tell you which auto glass shop to use. In the auto glass industry this is called “steering,” which is against the law. It’s your choice; so choose the professionals at Cornerstone Auto Glass.

Is a windshield replacement a “no-fault” claim?

windshield replacement-Many people do not want to make a claim against their insurance for auto glass damage, as they’re afraid that their rates will increase. A cracked windshield, however, is usually not your fault. It’s what the insurance companies call a “NO FAULT” claim, and as such, don’t typically raise your rates on your insurance. The glass only damage falls under the comprehensive part of your insurance, not the collision which keeps them from raising the rates and allows you to have the $0 deductible here in Florida.

What if I only have liability coverage?

Because liability insurance only provides coverage for the damages to another vehicle, auto glass services are not covered under your liability policy. Cornerstone Auto Glass offers competitive cash prices to those without comprehensive insurance. Call one of our representatives today to get your fast and easy cash quote.

What states carry the $0 deductible law with comprehensive insurance?

If you live in Florida, Kentucky, Massachusetts, South Carolina, or Arizona, you live in what’s called a “zero deductible” state. That means your insurance company is required by law to allow you to purchase a windshield repair or replacement using your insurance with no deductible as long as you have comprehensive insurance on your vehicle. If you live in one of these states, and have comprehensive insurance, it makes sense to use your insurance to pay for your auto glass needs. Florida and Massachusetts only fully cover your windshield, but Kentucky and South Carolina cover all of your glass (door, vent, back glass, windshield, etc.).

Does my windshield really protect me in an accident?

Yes! Windshield safety and windshield replacement is very important. Your windshield an integral part in roof crush protection in a roll-over accident. It also provides the bracing your passenger-side airbags need to function properly. If your windshield loses adhesion in a collision or roll-over, your safety is in jeopardy. This is why it is imperative that your auto glass replacement be done by a trained professional like ours, here at Cornerstone Auto Glass.

What are the guidelines for a windshield repair instead of doing a windshield replacement?

Windshield repair is recommended if the damaged areas is less than the size of a nickel (bullseye).Windshield Repairs are not done for cosmetic reasons, only to structuralize the glass, so you may still see a mark on the windshield. Because of this reason, windshield repairs cannot be done if they are located in the driver’s line of vision. The line of vision is considered the sweep of the windshield wiper of the driver’s side of the vehicle.

How long does a windshield repair typically take?

On average, a windshield repair on a chip or ding in your auto glass can take a half hour or less and your car is immediately available for driving.

How long does it take to do a windshield replacement?

Most windshield replacements take roughly an hour, and an hour for the adhesives to set before you can drive your vehicle. Some windshields do take a little bit longer depending on the air temperature and the features of the windshield. Your technician will provide you with a safe drive away time for your windshield replacement when he has completed the job.

What is OEM auto glass? Is it the same as auto glass from a dealership?

OEM stands for Original Equipment Manufacture. This means that the auto glass meets the original specifications for safety and quality as the glass that your car came with from the factory. Auto manufacturers do not make glass, they use different auto glass manufacturers to make the glass for your vehicle. A “dealer” glass is the same glass the auto glass shop would have, made from the same auto glass plant, but in the process, the auto glass manufacture stamps the brand name such as Toyota, Ford, etc. making it a “dealer” glass. Same exact glass, but more expensive due to the brand name.

What is the difference between my car windshield and the other glass that is in my car?

Your car windshield is made of laminated safety glass. What makes this auto glass unique is its special construction, designed to offer optimum safety in the event of a crash. Laminated safety glass is made up of two pieces of glass with a thin layer of vinyl sandwiched between them.

  • When a small object strikes a piece of laminated safety glass, often only the outer layer breaks. This is what makes a windshield repair for a rock chip, ding, or small crack possible. With a more severe impact, the glass may crack but usually does not shatter. This type of glass also acts as a barrier to objects moving inside the vehicle.
  • Your side and rear car windows are made of tempered glass. This type of auto glass is put through a special process where it is heated, then rapidly cooled. This tempering process makes the glass many times stronger than unprocessed glass of the same thickness. Upon impact, tempered glass is designed to break into small pieces of glass about the size of small pebbles. There should be no large, jagged pieces that could injure the driver or other passengers. The force necessary to break a piece of tempered glass is considerably more than that required to break non-tempered glass.